Legislation on GPS for people with dementia - Stella Care

Legislation on GPS for people with dementia

and the role of Stella Care

The rules for using GPS trackers on people with dementia who walks away were changed in 2010. The current legislation makes it easy to equip dementia patients with a GPS tracker. The person with dementia has to protest directly against being equipped with a GPS tracker.

It is our experience that only very few people mind wearing a GPS tracker. We strive to deliver small GPS trackers that are easy to hide under your clothes, place discretely in your belt or wear as a wristwatch.

At Stella Care, we wish to make people aware, however, that legislation is not enough in itself. The battery of the GPS tracker must be charged, the person with dementia must wear the tracker, and the caregivers must be able to operate the tracking system.

Our system is very easy to use. Our objective is that everyone must be able to operate it. This includes everything from it being easy to get the person with dementia to wear the GPS tracker, to the app being so easy to use that everyone is able to operate.

Should you, however, need assistance, Søren or Rasmus from Stella Care can be contacted 24/7.  It is reassuring to know that you can always receive help under pressure – and that it is not just a call centre that answers the phone.

What is written in the law? Here is an excerpt from the Danish Consolidation Act on Social Services:

Alarm Systems (Social Services, section 125: 1-2)

If a person with dementia leaves his/her residential or day-care facility and is in risk of causing injury to himself/herself, the personnel may decide to use personal alarm or paging systems for the person in question as part of the daily care if the person with dementia is unable to consent and does not object to such use.

This is not considered use of force and should not be registered and reported. If the person with dementia objects to the use of the alarm/tracking system, the personnel may request that the municipality gives permission to use personal alarm or tracking systems.

It must be documented that the person with dementia leaves his/her residential or day-care facility and is unable to take care of himself/herself, and the personnel must have tried different nursing and social pedagogical initiatives to avoid that the person with dementia leaves his/her residential or day-care facility before considering alarm and tracking systems.

A decision to use alarm and tracking systems for persons with dementia may be made indefinite. The use must be subjected to ongoing evaluation.